How Much Should You Budget for Closing Costs? Let’s Take a Look

How Much Should You Budget for Closing Costs? Let's Take a LookIf you’re in the market for a new home, you’re probably trying to budget for all of the expenses that come with a home purchase. After all, the asking price isn’t necessarily the entire amount that you’ll pay – there are other expenses that will factor in to the final price. One such expense is your closing costs.

Closing costs are the miscellaneous fees you’ll pay when you sign the deal to buy your home. But how much do you need to save up for closing costs? Here’s what you need to know.

The General Guideline for What to Expect

Most mortgage advisors will tell you that you should expect to pay about 3 to 5 percent of your mortgage in closing costs. By law, your mortgage provider is obligated to give you a Loan Estimate form which is designed to help you understand the key features, costs, and risks of the mortgage loan. Three business days before the loan closes your mortgage provider will also give you a Closing Estimate form to review all of the costs of the transaction including all closing costs.

How Your Closing Costs Break Down

Your lender will give you a breakdown of costs in your Loan Estimate and Closing Estimate. But in general, there are certain closing costs you can expect to pay.

One cost that most lenders include is the loan origination fee, a small charge to compensate the lender for the time it takes to prepare the initial loan documents. There will also typically be a loan application fee, which can vary per lender.

Your lender may require you to get private mortgage insurance depending on your situation. The title search and title insurance to protect your lender from title fraud is another fee you should consider, and you’ll also likely want to buy title insurance to protect yourself.

There are also several other closing costs to keep in mind, like escrow fees, notary fees, pest inspections, underwriting fees, and the mortgage broker’s commission. All in all, you’ll want to budget approximately $5,000 in closing costs for every $100,000 you borrow.

Closing costs can be quite expensive, which is why you’ll want to make sure you budget appropriately when you buy your new home. A mortgage professional can help you to figure out how much you need to budget for closing costs. Call your local mortgage advisor today to learn more about budgeting for the home buying process.

Advertisements

The Down Payment: Four Great Reasons To Make The Largest Down Payment You Can Afford

The Down Payment: Four Great Reasons To Make The Largest Down Payment You Can AffordIf you’re looking for a new home, you’ve probably heard lots of advice about down payments. About how it’s okay to just have a five percent down payment – you’ll still get approved. About how you should make the down payment as small as possible to avoid cash flow problems.

In truth, you’re actually better off making the largest down payment you can possibly afford. Even if you have to slice up other areas of your budget, save for a few more years before you buy, or take a second job on the weekends, it’ll be worth it in the end. Here are just four reasons why you should make the largest down payment possible.

You Can Avoid Useless Insurance Premiums

Although you can buy a house with as little as a five percent down payment, it’s in your best interest to make a much larger down payment if you can. Mortgage insurance premiums can be as high as one percent of the loan’s value, which means until you’ve invested 20 percent of the home’s value in equity, you’ll have to pay an extra one percent every year. If you pay at least 20 percent of the purchase price upfront, you’ll be able to avoid having to get private mortgage insurance – so you keep more of your money in your own pocket.

You’ll Pay Much Less Interest

The less you have to borrow, the less you have to pay back – for more reasons than one.

When you take out a mortgage, the interest rate applies to the principal amount that you owe – and over time, the interest can run on top of interest, quickly outpacing the original sum. Having a larger down payment means the interest applies to a smaller sum. And that means it accumulates slower and ends up being a smaller amount over time.

You’ll Have More Ammunition In A Bidding War

Offering up a larger down payment is also a great way to make sure you get your dream house, especially if it’s a popular property with multiple offers. The seller isn’t just going to consider who offers the most money – they’re also going to consider which buyer is most likely to get a mortgage. After all, failing to get a mortgage is one of the most common reasons why real estate deals fail.

If you can show that you’re able to make a larger down payment, you’ll have a better shot at getting a mortgage – and that means sellers will prioritize you over other buyers.

You’ll Get A Great Start On Building Equity

Your home equity is equal to the difference between your home’s fair market value and the amount of debt invested into the home. If you don’t have enough equity in your home and home prices in your neighborhood fall, you may find yourself in a situation where you owe more money on your home than it’s worth – a phenomenon known as negative equity. By making the largest possible down payment you can, you’ll have a great head start on building your home’s equity – which may help you profit if you decide to sell in the future.

Buying a house isn’t easy, but making the largest down payment you can afford will give you a great financial head start on home ownership. Want to learn more about how to afford the home of your dreams? Contact your local mortgage professional today for practical advice to help you maximize your down payment.

The Pros and Cons of Using Spare Funds to Pay Your Mortgage Down Faster

A home mortgage payment can be a large or even the largest expehttps://i2.wp.com/smartblogcontent.com/i/The_Pros_and_Cons_of_Using_Spare_Funds_to_Pay_Your_Mortgage_Down_Faster.jpgnse in a person’s budget, and not having this payment any longer can be a life changing experience. Because of this, you may be dreaming about the day when you no longer have to make this payment. Some people may even actively make extra payments to their mortgage in order to pay the outstanding balance off more quickly. These may be funds from an IRS tax refund, cash received from the holidays or a birthday or some other windfall. Before you make the decision about whether to use spare funds to pay your mortgage down more quickly, consider these pros and cons.

The Benefits of Making Extra Mortgage Payments

You can shave many years off of your home mortgage when you make even a single extra payment each year. This can help you to achieve long-term financial goals, build equity and avoid paying more than necessary in interest charges. Keep in mind that any principal that is removed from the outstanding balance now will not generate interest charges going forward. This can have a snowball effect on your home equity, and this is especially true when you make extra payments on a regular basis.

Why Extra Payments Are Not Always the Best Option

Clearly, there are some great benefits associated with making extra payments on your home mortgage. However, there are also some downsides to consider before you take this step. Your home mortgage may be one of your debts with the lowest interest rate.

For example, many mortgage interest rates today are below five percent while some credit card rates may exceed 15 or 18 percent. Over the long-term, you may benefit more from savings on interest charges by reducing higher interest rate debts. Even if you have no other debts besides your home mortgage payment, you may be able to invest the money for a higher return than the interest rate on the mortgage.

Each person has different short and long term goals as well as a different financial situation to consider. With how low mortgage rates are today, however, many will benefit from paying off high interest rate debts and making smart investment decisions with any extra money they have.